Alzheimer’s a multi-factoral approach

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most prevalent form of dementia and it is estimated that 160 million people globally by 2050 will have this disease.

So far the search for a single ‘silver bullet’ pharmaceutical approach to treating AD has not delivered anything other than a temporary slight improvement in symptoms with no long term impact on disease progression. Recent biochemical research however would suggest that AD is both triggered and perpetuated by a complex interaction of different factors and that a multi-factoral approach to treating this devastating condition may provide better outcomes.

Pioneering work is being undertaken in this area by Dr Bredesen, who describes dementia as being primarily a ‘metabolic problem’. In a small but ground breaking study published in Aging in 2014, a 90% success rate in both arresting and reversing early stage AD was reported. Dr Bredesen uses a combination of personalised dietary and lifestyle interactions (includes supporting digestive function, identifying imbalances in the gut, correcting identified nutrient deficiencies, optimising vitamin D levels, eating food over a particular window of time in the day, assessing metal toxicity, optimising sleep, increasing exercise and movement, reducing inflammation, identifying food sensitivities, supporting mitochondrial function and stimulating the brain) with the client to achieve substantial results over a 3 to 12 month period. Larger clinical trials are currently underway in the UK and USA.

These results on the face of it look to good to be true, but in reality simply reflect the obvious which is that chronic disease is rooted in the mismatch between our genetics and the modern world that we have created for us to live in. Your environment (diet, toxic load, stress/trauma, and infections) is fundamental to your long-term health and well-being and should be one of the first areas to seriously evaluate when confronted with any chronic condition. What makes you, you is unique to you and this is the premise behind the ‘functional model’ of health. Working with a functionally trained health practitioner on any chronic condition, along with the required work and commitment that these types of interventions require, can provide significant health benefits.

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